Writing

Superpowers In Reality

It’s no secret I love comic book stuff.  From the weird and surreal to the football drama to straight up superheroes, I find the medium ripe with potential.  Without budget costs for special efforts, anything is possible, and with the idea of a picture telling a thousand words, it can be extremely effective with only a few words.

And when it’s done well, it can be brilliant.

The Strange Talent Of Luther Strode is one of these brilliant pieces.  It’s a reflection of the whole Spider-man, Batman, responsibility thing, twisting it to be more realistic.  For example, superheroes often patrol the night looking for trouble; in reality, to stumble upon a crime at the exact time it happens is near impossible.  And even then, maybe they don’t want you stepping in.

And what if you do?  What if, in your inexperience, you do something wrong, you make a mistake?  What if, in showing off your muscles, you forget that you can be outthought, outmoved and outmaneuvered?

What if you just forget your own strength?

Luther deals with all of that and more.  He starts with high hopes; he ends up a monster (at least in his own eyes).

I love plays on traditional themes.  Things that question standard tropes and conventional views.  It’s part of why I actually enjoyed Man Of Steel.  Would we really embrace an alien of such power so readily?  Or would we, in our fear, overreact, or possibly react exactly proportional to what is an existential threat, if it so chose?

I know it wasn’t traditional Superman, but it asked an important question.  The question any story asks, really.

What if?

It’s the quality of the words that come after that determine whether the question was any good.

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