Writing

Dimensional Travel And Choices

I know a lot of people hate time travel books. I get it. It’s circular and illogical and doesn’t make sense. It’s incredibly difficult to postulate what might happen as a result of certain changes, however minor.

Still, alternative histories are popular and can often result in great stories about our favourite characters. It allows risks to be taken that don’t affect the main timeline, but can create wonderful emotional moments.

People otherwise untouchable can die or be changed in ways they never would have been allowed to in main continuity.

And that’s not even a time travel requirement.

Just a dimensional one, wherein each choice made, whether it’s whether to kill Hitler in his youth or what to have for lunch, splits off into a new dimension, each careening forth on its own path.

The darkest timeline to the lightest one, with infinite variations in between. Every choice by every being, spinning off a new thing. Every variation on a theme. Every possible chance encounter or event. Every coincidence, every missed connection. Every random possibility. A new dimension. A new timeline.

It’s tough to get your head around, and I always admire those who lean into it well, like Rick Remender and Matteo Scalera in Black┬áScience. It can, of course, get way too confusing, and that can be very off-putting, even to seasoned sci-fi vets.

We just have to hope what we’re doing doesn’t land us in the darkest timeline, because hell, nobody needs that.

Of course, if this dimensional theory is true, some of are definitely going to get it. Let’s just hope we’re in the one that manages redemption from all this orange-skinned, authoritarian, environment implosion path we’re currently careening forth on.

But then, that all depends on our choices, does it not?

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